AP Biology at ISM is a two-year course; students who take AP Biology I are required to take AP Biology II the following year (or the same year, if the student’s schedule allows). AP Biology is a rigorous, college-level survey course with an emphasis on depth of understanding, connections across the entire range of content, and application of science practices—especially quantitative skills. Some of the content covered in AP Biology will review and extend material previously discussed in Life Science and Biology; other material will be entirely new.

Topics studied in AP Biology I include basic organic chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism, photosynthesis & respiration, cell reproduction, classical and molecular genetics, biotechnology, and genomes. A minimum of 25% of class time will consist of lab work.

Prerequisites:  Biology and Chemistry; score of 80 or above in both

AP Biology at ISM is a two-year course; students who take AP Biology I are required to take AP Biology II the following year (or the same year, if the student’s schedule allows). AP Biology is a rigorous, college-level survey course with an emphasis on depth of understanding, connections across the entire range of content, and application of science practices—especially quantitative skills. Some of the content covered in AP Biology will review and extend material previously discussed in Life Science and Biology; other material will be entirely new.

Topics studied in AP Biology II include evolution, bacteria, botany, zoology, anatomy & physiology, animal behavior, and ecology. A minimum of 25% of class time will consist of lab work.

Prerequisite:  AP Biology I (or concurrent enrollment)

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying themes that cut across the many topics: Science is a process, Energy conversions underlie all ecological processes, The Earth itself is one interconnected system, Humans alter natural systems, Environmental problems have a cultural and social context, and Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems.

Have you ever wondered how to be a good steward of the Earth or of your own body? This course is designed to help students apply scientific knowledge and practices to decisions concerning human interactions with the environment and personal nutrition. They will learn how common practices and everyday decisions affect their daily life and the health of the environment. Students will also discover how Earth's dynamic characteristics influence humanity.

Topics:

Ecosystems

Matter & Interactions

Space