Section

  • Our schedule this term is hectic and high pressure.   Here is a summary.

    • Wed April 5: Exam 1 will be 90 minutes and will be the AP practice exam for Mechanics (the "Mock Exam").   We will not have more than one period for review of mechanics.
    • Tue April 18: Exam 2 will be 90 minutes and will be the AP practice exam for E&M.  This means that by April 17, we need to be done with the EM material, which is quick.
    • Monday, 8 May: AP exam

    Here is a plan in more detail (note what is new this year over last year)   The rest is basically review from last year.

    • Week of 13 March.   Chapters 25 and 26. (total current with variable current flux)
    • Week of 20 March.  Chapters 27 and 28.
    • Week of 27 March.   Chapters 28 and 29 (biot-savart law and ampere's law)
    • Week of 3 April.   Exam 1 and Chapter 30
    • Week of 10 April  Chapters 30 and 31 (LC circuit)
    • Week of 17 April: Exam 2 and begin review for AP exam
    • Week of 24 April: review for AP exam
    • Week of 1 May: review for AP exam
    • Weeks after AP exam:   special project with lab, analysis, presentation
    • Week of 29 May: Final exam

  • This section

    The end of 3 years of physics blogs.....

    One more report during these last two weeks.  And one option for extra credit.

    Final lab due.

    On Wednesday, May 24:

    gRaduating senioR Rocket Report (R4).  I require a group powerpoint and presentation.  Below is a repeat of the objectives.  I want you to gather your launch data, then report on all of the 10 points below in the presentation.  With the video you have there are lots of options.  

    1. Be safe: glasses any time engines are out of their container or in a rocket
    2. Find thrust data from literature
    3. Collect thrust curve using force meter 
    4. Make rockets flyable
    5. Predict height using thrust curve
    6. Measure height using any means
    7. Calculate friction of ascent and descent
    8. Get some good pics (contact E Buchner)

    Extra credit experiment.

    For 25 points extra credit, any group can do the Marshmallow Speed of Light Lab (MSLL), which is posted in FILES. To count, it must be presented to the class with 5-10 slides on powerpoint.

    • Monday: good luck
    • Tue: rocket lab starts
    • Wed: AP English, no class
    • Thurs: AP stats, the rest should work on your rocket
    • Friday: rocket lab; practice launch
    • Next Monday: rocket. design tests, analysis
    • next Tuesday: launch and measure
    • next Wednesday: launch
    • Next Thursday: launch
    • Next Friday:

    the hypothesis

    you can build and fly rockets and with measurements determine the average drag on the rocket as it ascends and descends.  You can also apply propagation of error to determine the most likely source of the most error.

  • Our last week of review.  This week we'll work on more of the practice test FR problems from recent years.

    Here are the steps I recommended when solving the MX problems.

    •They are testing comprehension and speed.
    •Do not try to solve the problem on first read.
    •Read it all think of broad concepts involved: and don’t worry about numbers or direction details
    •Underline what exactly is asked for.
    •Look at the possible answers for clues
    •Re-read the question and solve.
    •Leave it for later if you don’t immediately have an approach.

    Due Monday:  find 3 FR problems you haven't done, and do them

    Tuesday: do the MX problems handed out on Monday.

    Due Wednesday: what is your weakest area for Free Response?  find a problem in that area?

                on Wednesday, let's find all the classics for the AP exam 

    Due Thursday:  do the MX problems handed out on Wednesday.

    Friday: you should do 2 FR problems all the way through.  Try to do 2-4 a day until Monday to fine tune your problem solving skills.

    and our project for the next two weeks.

    important to watch:     

    Due next monday: get a good night's sleep, eat a breakfast with plenty of protein, and do your best.  Good luck.

  • By observing many students through the years, I can say this: if you want a 4 or 5, you should be doing at least two FR or 10 mx each night for prep. It's great practice. Look at the problem, try to set it up before you look at the answer.  For additional hints, read the graders comments in Student Performance Q&A.

    In class this week we will practice on MX problems from prior practice tests.  MX problems emphasize speed over careful approach, which I don't like to emphasize, but speed does give one measure of how well you understand.  We'll look at these problems to find the conceptual key to solving.

    Due monday: notate the equation sheet for E&M, which means identify when the equation is used, or limitations on it.

    Tuesday:  do an E&M 1, 2, and 3 FR problem

    Due Wednesday:  1993 Mech MX problems, in FILES/AP practice questions 

    Due Thursday:  

    Due Friday: 1993 E&M MX problems, in FILES/AP practice questions

    Due next Monday: find 3 FR problems you haven't done, and do them

    Points:

    • Know and apply faradays law and lenz’s law for simple geometries
    • Solve for inductance in a solenoid
    • Know how to solve self induction and mutual induction problems
    • Derive solution for RL circuits
    • Show plots for RL circuits as in RC circuits
    • Understand and show calculation for energy in a mag field
  • Do you remember Charlie MacKenzie-Smith?  He graduated from Columbia with a Mech Eng degree.  http://www.thebeasts.squarespace.com/

    We are 3 weeks from the AP.  Remember that we moved our exam to Friday morning this week at 7:40am?

    Due Monday: do 3 of these E&M AP problems 2009 E&M 3; 2007 EM3; 2008EM3; 2006E&M 3;  

    Due Wednesday: do all 3 FR E&M AP exam from 2010     

    Due Thursday: do the multiple choice problems for chapter 19 in Barrons.;  we will go through the 2008 practice exam FR E&M in class.

    Due Friday: Exam 2, E&M Practice Exam, starting at 7:40am.

       predict the result of this before you watch the end http://io9.com/watch-what-happens-when-you-wring-out-a-washcloth-in-sp-476159356

    Due next monday:  notate the equation sheet for E&M, which means identify when the equation is used, or limitations on it.

    Due after APs, our last lab do at home or here at school, present 5-6 slides with photos in class, 15 pointsFinding the Speed of Light withMarshmallows-A Take-Home Lab ; Robert H. Stauffer, Jr., Cimarron-Memorial High School, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA  http://www.physics.umd.edu/icpe/newsletters/n34/marshmal.htm

    Points:

    • Know and apply faradays law and lenz’s law for simple geometries
    • Solve for inductance in a solenoid
    • Know how to solve self induction and mutual induction problems
    • Derive solution for RL circuits
    • Show plots for RL circuits as in RC circuits
    • Understand and show calculation for energy in a mag field
  • Due Monday:   29: P-61, 67 and AP E&M MX problems from AP course description p 53 of http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap-physics-course-description.pdf

    Due Wed:  do the first 1/2 of MX questions from Barrons, Chapter 18

    Due Thursday: do the remainder of the MX problems from Barrons, Chapter 18

    Due Friday: no school.

    Due next Monday: do 3 of these E&M AP problems 2009 E&M 3; 2007 EM3; 2008EM3; 2006E&M 3

    We moved our next exam to Friday 21 April at 7:40.

    Points for this week:   Chapters 30 and 31 (LC circuit)

    • review and be able to apply Faraday and Lenz Law for induction
    • show that you can apply Biot_Savart law to a hemispherical wire
    • can you do Ampere's Law?
  • FOR PREP,  YOU SHOULD DO 5 MX OR 1 FR EACH DAY FROM THE MANY PRACTICE EXAMS: PATEL, AP WEBSITE, BARRONS, ONLINE SOURCES.

     5:58

    Due Mon:  do all MX problems from the 1998 E&M exam, in FILES.  Some of them will be ahead of what we've studied.  Do your best to look that up.  We're moving fast. 
    do Maxwell's wheel drop, and find I using available information.

    Due Tue: Patel Mech exam 2.  Present your answer for Maxwell's wheel.

    Wed:  Exam.  Starting at 7:40, we will do MX and FR for Mechanics.

    Due Thurs:   29: P-5, 27, 32,38, 41, 47, 53 (do ones that pose a challenge)

    Due Friday:    Choose 1-2 FR E&M problems that we have not done.   Be prepared to present one.  Do the MX problems from chapter 17 in Barrons.  

    Due next Monday:   29: P-61, 67 and AP E&M MX problems from AP course description p 71 of http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap-physics-course-description.pdf

    Points:   Chapter 30 this week

    • Know and apply the Biot-Savart law for simple geometries
    • Know and apply Ampere’s Law for simple geometries
    • Be able to explain the formation of the magnetic field from a moving charge
  • Due Mon:  AP E&M FR questions 2004-2, 2007-1, 2006-2, and   27-45,63,69, .and Barrons chapter 15 FR 4&5, p449-450

    Due Tue:  Patel Mech exam 1, p 39-44     And finish indexing the FR questions you started last week for 2004-2016.  The template is below on this blog.

    Due Wednesday: do text 28: Questions 1-7;     

    Due Friday: for the electric hockey physlet in PHET https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/legacy/electric-hockey, how would you determine if Coulomb's law is being obeyed?  Also do FR 1 and 3 in Barrons chapter 17.

    Due next Mon:do all MX problems from the 1998 E&M exam, in FILES

    Due next Tue: Patel Mech exam 2

    Next week: chapter 29 

    Points for this week:   Chapters 28 and 29 (biot-savart law and ampere's law)

    • 1. demonstrate that you can show how to master brushing your teeth.
    • 2. does anyone read these points for the week?
    • 3. for the Coulomb's problem, be careful about defining x =0 and direction of a and F
  • Due Monday: AP 2016 EM2

    Due Tue: barrons chapter 14 all MX problems;

    Wed: 27-11, 13,29, 23, 33, 74; and you'll index the past 12 years of AP exams in class.

    Due Friday: no school

    Due next Mon: AP E&M FR questions 2004-2, 2007-1, 2006-2, and   27-45,63,69, .and Barrons chapter 15 FR 4&5, p449-450

    Note: look at the last 10 years, and you'll see a capacitor circuit problem almost every year

    Points:  chapters 27 and 28 this short week

    • How are charges pumped in an emf device
    • Derivation of work for current flow
    • Derivation of current from energy conservation
    • Derivation of current from potential conservation (Kirchhoff)
    • RC circuits graphs and AP problems

    practice: 27: P-62, 28: P-9, 14, 26, 46.  AP EM2 2012, 

  • Welcome back to term 3.  You are now 8/9 done with high school physics!   This is the final push to the end, and it will be important and intense.  We'll relax again in mid-May.

    Due Monday: none

    Due Tuesday: 25: P-7, 17, 19, 13

    Due Wednesday: 25: P-35, 53, 21, 25

    Due Friday:  26: P-11, 26, 54, 59, 39, 73, 71

    Due next Monday:  AP 2016 EM2

    Points for this week:  we will cover chapters 25 and 26

    • Understand what a capacitor does: stores charges separated by distance, requires work to separate them
    • Know how to calculate C generally using Gauss, then V = - then C= q/V
    • Follow the charge to understand how capacitors in circuits will behave

    extra stuff: AP 1987 M3, AP 1989M3 (both posted in files), Barrons FRII p 608, Barrons p599 MX questions: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10

    Barrons p 601 MX: 11,14,15,16,17,18,19, 21,23,24,25,27,29,31,32,34

  • http://robotics.nasa.gov/events/livestream/index.php?stream=ntl_0225-2815

    Due Monday: no class

    Due Tuesday: 25: P-21, 25, 19, and AP 2002 E&M 2

    Due Wed:    AP 2014 a-d

    Due Thurs:    Barrons Mechanics Practice Test 1; MX problems (as in any problems with the answers available, you should do them each to your best ability, and use the answer to check your work.)

    Due Friday:  26: P-11, 26, 35, 54, 59, 39, 73, 71. 

    The Final Exam has 29 MX and 4 FR questions.  Balanced mech and E&M.  Rotation, gravity, oscillation are good things to review.

    practice problems:

    1)   I want to launch a satellite mass M into a stable orbit at 3REarth. (above the center of Earth, mass ME).  a)  what is final v of satellite?  b)  what is potential energy at this altitude?  c)  how much work must the rocket do to lift and accelerate the rocket?  d)  what is the total energy at this altitude?   e)  now if I remain in stable orbit, but decrease the altitude, what happens to total E and to U and K?

    2)   an equilateral triangle of mass M and side L hangs by its vertex.   a)  what work is needed to rotate it to horizontal position?  b) If then let go, what will ω be when it is back to starting position.  c)  what will period of the oscillation be?

    3)  for a certain gravity field, U=r3.   a) what is the shape of the PE curve?   b) what is the force at r = a?

  • Review page 37 of course description to learn meaning of words on page 37+

    Due Monday: 25: P-7, 17, 19

    HW due Tuesday: 25: P-3, 7,13,  35, 53.  

    Due Wed:  do 3 Barrons FR problems on Gauss

    Due Thurs: exam 2 in class.

    Due Friday: no class  

    Due next Monday: no class  

    Due next Tuesday:25: P-21, 25, 19, and AP 2002 E&M 2

    Points:

    • practice 2003 EM1 (tough, but nice.)
    • Understand what a capacitor does: stores charges separated by distance, requires work to separate them
    • Know how to calculate C generally using Gauss, then V = - then C= q/V
    • Follow the charge to understand how capacitors in circuits will behave

     

  • Due Monday: 24: 23, 63, 79   

    Due Tuesday: chpt 13: FR1 from Barrons, p 397   

    Due Wed: read 23 sections 4-9; 23: P-19, 21, 25, 29, 37, 49

    Due THurs: do 2 of these FR's:  AP 1990E&M 1; AP 1999 E&M 1;  2004 E&M 1

    Friday: quiz on Gauss’s Law, potential, and E fields.  we'll do 1980E1 in class for some review

    Due next Monday: 25: P-7, 17, 19

    NOTE: once you get your pendulum labs back, please schedule 10 min with me to discuss your pendulum analysis by 17 Feb.  Bring your lab and any supporting docs.

    Mon: more line integrals practice

    Tue: what happens when conductors are used--look at the shell problems

    Wed:  more Gauss and line of charge E problem

    Friday: review of 22-24 chapters problems    practice: sphere radius a.   rho = r3/4.   sketch charges and field lines.  find E for each zone.  Find V at edge (radius a).  Find V at center compared to edge.  Plot E and V vs. position

    summary of key steps in all problems.

    1. draw physical setup
    2. add representative +/- charges at correct ratio
    3. add E field lines for each +/- charge drawn
    4. observe where E is zero, and where it higher or lower
    5. sketch a rough sketch of E given your view
    6. use Gauss to find exact relationships for E
    7. integrate to find ΔV and carefully consider limits for V2 and V1
  • We have an exam on 16 Feb.   Are any of you on the showchoir tour?  If so, talk to me and plan to take the exam early

    Due Monday : chapter 12 problems from Barrons -- Practice exercises Barrons 12 MX 1-6; FR 1-2; bring the calculations for total mechanical energy of the pendulum at the beginning and at the end

    Due Tuesday: do the FR question below from 1986

    Due Wednesday: show me your answers to the 4 questions in the complex pendulum lab

    Due Thursday: section 24-5 and 24-7; section 24-9: P-31, 35, 40, 7

    Due Friday: one page memo for complex pendulum   AP 2011 E&M 1, AP 2010 E&M 1; quiz

    Due next Monday: 24: 23, 63, 79 and do the Ballistic Pendulum video analysis in FILES

    schedule

    Tuesday: chapter 23, section 5 only:introduce gauss law and derive coloumb’s law:
    Wednesday: chapter 24, potential

    Friday: quiz on electric field for simple line of charge; hand out ap problems

    Points:

    1. Show how to derive field for points, lines of charge, shapes of charge

    2. Show how to derive potential for points, lines of charge, shapes of charge

    3. Demonstrate how Gauss’ Law allows fields around charge distributions other than point charges

    1986 FR1

    1.  Three point charges produce the electric equipotential lines shown on the diagram above.

    a.   Draw arrows at points L, N. and U on the diagram to indicate the direction of the electric field at these points.

    b.   At which of the lettered points is the electric field E greatest in magnitude? Explain your reasoning.

    c.   Compute an approximate value for the magnitude of the electric field E at point P.

    d.   Compute an approximate value for the potential difference, VM ‑ VS, between points M and S.

    e.   Determine the work done by the field if a charge of +5 x 10‑12 coulomb is moved from point M to point R.

    f.   If the charge of +5 x 10‑12 coulomb were moved from point M first to point S, and then to point R, would the answer to (e)  be different, and if so, how?

  • Due Monday: 21: P-7, 12, 21,    review exam.

    Due Tuesday:    do complex pendulum in class.

    Due Wednesday: 21: P-23, 35, 53,49, 25

    Due :Thursday.  Bring video analysis of the lab data.   The video is posted in FILES on ISMScience.  For today, have your pendulum loggerpro video plots printed or on a laptop showing postion vs. time complete for 10 full cycles.  show x vs. t and y vs. t graphs for the run

    due  Friday: do one AP-C free response related to chapter 21.    ALSO Due Friday: Lab pendulum: bring your video analysis of the data --  Explain how you will extract data for "k" of the spring and "L" of the pendulum.  

    Due next Monday : chapter 12 problems from Barrons -- Practice exercises Barrons 12 MX 1-6; FR 1-2; bring the calculations for total mechanical energy of the pendulum at the beginning and at the end

    Due next Friday: memo report for complex pendulum

    We are plowing through charge and fields with the help of Barrons.

    1. we are starting electricity.  You are responsible to review the fundamentals of charges, coulomb's law, and the basic material of chapter 21.

    we will review this in class by reviewing the problems

    topics covered:

    problem 21 in detail.  then practice on this:  cylinder of radius r1 to r2 and with rho = br2.  what is Q?  Then do cube of size 40cm, with rho = 2r in one dimension.

    problem 23 in detail.  then practice on this: charge +q is position y above the origin.  Find E(y) for fixed position X on the x axis.  Sketch and plot before any math is done.

  • Due Tuesday:   Ping Pong Lab part 2.  This is a formal report, but since it is the "theoretical" portion of the lab, you can omit sections 4 and 5 in the guidelines.  You should use and report the consensus data, and explain where that came from.   Give credit to everyone else by name.   You can reference your part 1 report, but this report should stand on its own.

    Due Wednesday: 15: P-77, 79, 91, 73, 95, 93, and do a 2-dot problem that we have not done for presentation.

    Look at this 15-minute TED talk.  This is what you should be like: skeptical of claims.   http://www.ted.com/talks/ben_goldacre_battling_bad_science.html  Most bad science is in the area of health and nutrition.  Can you explain why? 

    Due Thursday:   AP 1990M3  Review for exam

    Due Friday: exam 1 in class.  

    Due next Monday: 21: P-7, 12, 21 

    goals for this week: complete the basic mastery of oscillations.  work through all MX and FR in Barrons oscillation chapter.

    next week: handout and discuss our next lab; complex pendulum motion
    and speaking of angular momentum, watch this video   and be prepared to discuss (I like this Smarter Every Day guy)

  • We are going fast and I'm assigning much HW. To help you become mature learners, here is my advice: be selective and smart about which HW problems to do.  If I assign a long assignment, then select the 4-6 that are most helpful to you.  If you don't do any, then that just means you get a HW check.  But if you smartly pick the ones that help you learn and practice, then you're exams will go fine.

        Here's is a funny video about a guy who is too dependent on his equation sheet.  

         http://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000004115589/verbatim-expert-witness.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share 

    Due Monday:   Patel mechanics exam 1: 13, 16, 28, 31, 35 (this is posted in FILES) In #31, how do you differentiate between a collision and an external torque?

    Due Tuesday :  13: 37, 35, 43, 53   discuss the potential energy inside a planet.  See notes in FILES.

    Due Wednesday:  13: 61, 73, AP1999M2, and Barrons 10: MX questions 5-8. 

    Due Thursday: do the 1984 section of the MX problems.  35 questions.  located in FILES as CMC84mech

    Due Friday: 15: P-17, 23, 25 how long will day last if Earth rotated so fast that g=0 at the equator, P-33, 35, 41 , 51, 54

    Due next Tuesday:   Ping Pong Lab part 2.  This is a formal report, but since it is the "theoretical" portion of the lab, you can omit sections 4 and 5 in the guidelines.  You should use and report the consensus data, and explain where that came from.   Give credit to everyone else by name.   You can reference your part 1 report, but this report should stand on its own.

    Due next Wednesday: 15: P-77, 79, 91, 73, 95, 93   Look at this 15-minute TED talk.  This is what you should be like: skeptical of claims.   http://www.ted.com/talks/ben_goldacre_battling_bad_science.html  Most bad science is in the area of health and nutrition.  Can you explain why?

    on friday: introduce rotation lab.

     discuss exam 1 = 11 Multiple Choice problems at 3 points each + You choose 11 Free Response sections (letters) at 4 points each.  (topics are rotation, rotation, & SHM) You must clearly circumscribe with a box each section of your work and the answer that is to be graded.  I cannot and will not fish around looking for something that looks related.

    Practice: 2001 M2; 1995 M3

  • Look at this 15-minute TED talk.  This speaker is a model of good scientist: he is skeptical of claims.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/ben_goldacre_battling_bad_science.html

    Most bad science is in the area of health and nutrition.  Can you explain why?

  • NOTE REVISIONS THAT I'VE MADE TO ACCOUNT FOR STUDENTS BEING GONE THIS WEEK.

    Due Tuesday: Physics of the Impossible Slides are due before class, by email, and you will present today..      A mirror reverses left-right but not up-down.  Why is that?  Even more, if you lay sideways, now left-right is up-down, and the mirror figures that out.

    Due Wednesday:     start Lab on rotational dynamics, in FILES and handed out.

    Due Thursday:  complete lab on rotational dynamics

    Due Friday: 13: P-9, 13, 23, 25, 31; Barrons 10: MX questions 1-4;   AP 2014 Mech 3

    Due next Monday:     Patel mechanics exam 1: 13, 16, 28, 31, 35 (this is posted in FILES) In #31, how do you differentiate between a collision and an external torque?

    goals this week

    1. get back up to speed so we can make a lot of progress in this, our long stretch without breaks
    2. apply universal gravitation to bodies in orbital motion
    3. show me that you understand gravitational potential energy, a rather complicated concept.
    4. explain to me why as the moon's orbital velocity slows with time, it moves away from the earth and stays in stable orbit.

    Feedback in grading for the PingPong Lab part I.  

    • On the website I told you we can assume we know how the ping-pong gun normally works. So there is no need to going to details about how to shoot the ball.
    • But for this lab, capturing the proper video was an important part for you to describe.  So I expected information about the placement of the camera placement of the lights and running the video during the shot.
    • Similarly, in the material section you needed to say something about the camera at the model the speed and about the bright lights used. 
    • Then in the analysis part I expected you to comment on the odd shape of the velocity curve and how you used only the latter part after the air stop pushing the ball.  
    • I'm not going to accept rewrites, but you can come see me for clarification on any of this.

  • NOTE: Loggerpro 3.12 is released, and if you downloaded 3.11, you should update so you can analyze movies.  See Physics Tools for instructions

    Due Monday:  work out the spool problem that was due last week.   11: P-87, 71, 61; AP2003FR3   Loggerpro velocity profiles of all ping pong runs.  Show me V vs. x plots for each run and slope for a of deceleration for each run.

    Due Tue: do this FR question.

    Due Wed: 12: P-1, 5, 25, 23, 35 ,33, 37  check this out 

    http://gfm.aps.org/meetings/dfd-2014/5404ec5f69702d0771a40100

    Due Thurs: Written report of PingPong Lab, part 1.  Formal report, all sections.  see below 

    Due Friday:    No class?  Have a good holiday break.

    Due next  year, 3 January 2016: Patel mechanics exam 1: 13, 16, 28, 31, 35 (this is posted in FILES) 
    A mirror reverses left-right but not up-down.  Why is that?  Even more, if you lay sideways, now left-right is up-down, and the mirror figures that out.

    PingPong Lab: 

    Hypothesis for part 1: we can measure the acceleration of the ping pong ball for a range of velocities and summarize all the data in an Excel table (run, pvacuum, avg vslowing, aslowing)

    Report: due Tuesday, 14 Dec.  Formal report, all sections.  Should be brief.  For procedure, assume we know how the ping-pong gun normally works.  Need photo of entire setup and photo of measured zone.  (can't use screen shot from video, it's too grainy).  Include all Loggerpro graphs with linear fits for acceleration (if you yourself don't do a given video analysis, you must list on the graph who did it).  Include Excel table of data.

    COMMENTS: 1. if the hypothesis is to find acceleration, then it's important that you show and describe how to get a.  You must include the graph of loggerpro, and describe how to use v vs. t to get a.  2. "propagation of error" was asked for, which means propagate an error into the final answer.  an example would be initial pressure, or mass of ball

  • Due Monday: 11: P-5, 11, 12, 9   Your preliminary analysis for the lab, including all calculations for 1-4, is due today.  

    talk about Maxwell's wheel and questions

    Due Tuesday:11: P-35, 41, 92 .  A ping pong is shot from our cannon at 280 m/s and strikes the end of a plastic meter stick that is pivoting vertically by the other end.  The ball bounces off elastically.   what is the velocity of the stick just after the collision?  how far (what angle) does the stick swing?  what is the period of the stick as it swings?  how fast does the ball rebound from the collision?  I would like a symbolic answer to each and a numeric (you will have to collect some data about the objects)

    Due Wed: we will do the ping pong lab in class.  know all parts of the operation, and I'll assign them when you arrive.

    Thursday: 11: P-54, 77, 91;  Barrons 8: FR1, 2 and Barrons 8: MX1,2,3 

    Due Friday: .ap 2001m3, , ap1981M3 (in FILES), find string angle on spool for static pull, as demonstrated in lab, and as discussed in Q3 of chapter 9.

    Due next Monday: 11: P-87, 71, 61; AP2003FR3   Loggerpro velocity profiles of all ping pong runs.  Show me V vs. x plots for each run and slope for a of deceleration for each run.

    Wednesday: work on Barrons chapter 8:  FR 2, 4, and 3  

    Points:

    1. 1.Understand the parallel axis theorem, apply to rotation problems
    2. 2.Rolling, torque, and angular momentum
    3. 3.Find the applications of calculus to angular momentum problems
    4. 4.Be able to design a simple lab to text P-8 and conduct it

  • Welcome to Term 2.  Stay focused please, there is much material to cover, and we will pick up speed.

    Over New Years break, you have a reading assignment.  Don't panic, it is fun reading, but with some work.  See FILES Physics of the Impossible.

    Due Monday: none, we'll review final exam; also discuss the ping pong lab schedule.  

    Due Tuesday:AP 2004 M2

    Due Wed: Solve the statics problem done on Tuesday and compare predicted to measured tension.  If the entire operation was on a cart that accelerated at 2.0 m/s2, what would be the predicted tension?

    Due Thursday: read chapter 11; problems 10: P-101; and 11: Q-1,2,3,4,5;

    Due Friday:  none, but we will hand out the ping pong lab and discuss.

    Due next Monday: 11: P-5, 11, 12, 9, and find string angle on spool for static pull.   Your preliminary analysis for the lab, including all calculations for 1-4, is due today.

    Due next Tuesday: 11: P-35, 41, 92     A ping pong is shot from our cannon at 280 m/s and strikes the end of a plastic meter stick that is pivoting vertically by the other end.  The ball bounces off elastically.   what is the velocity of the stick just after the collision?  how far (what angle) does the stick swing?  what is the period of the stick as it swings?  how fast does the ball rebound from the collision?  I wouild like a symbolic answer to each and a numeric (you will have to collect some data about the objects)

    In class this week: 1986M2

    19th century rap......The Pirates of Penzance

    I am the very model of a modern Physics-General,
    I've information static, kinematic, and dynamical,
    I know the Laws of Newton, and I quote the men historical
    Einstein, Galileo, and the rest all categorical;
    I'm very well acquainted, too, with matters mathematical,
    I understand equations, even be they quadratical,
    About binomial theorem I'm teeming with a lot o' news,
    With many cheerful facts about the square of the hypotenuse.

    I'm very good at integral and differential calculus,
    I know the scientific names of beings animalculous;
    In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
    I am the very model of a modern Major-General.

    Slightly adjusted from Sir W.S. [William Schwenk] Gilbert born in 1836 on Nov 19

  • Due Monday: watch this video on frames of reference.....watch at 13 min to end to 25 min learn about Fictitious Forces and Non-inertial Frames   http://archive.org/details/frames_of_reference

               Also due Monday: Barrons Chapter 7 MX 6-10

    finish presentations of elevator lab.

    Due Tuesday:    find and solve one FR question that we have not done in class that requires momentum and/or rotation concepts.  Be prepared to present.

  • REVISION: The final exam will cover through Chapter 10 of your text and chapter 7 of Barrons.   We have almost 2 weeks for practice on these last chapters and review.

    WE ARE A FLIPPED CLASSROOM.  YOU REVIEW AND LEARN AT HOME, WE PRACTICE AND CLARIFY IN CLASS.

    Due Monday:  10: P-45, 53, plus Barrons chpt 7: Free Response 1-4  

    Due Tuesday: 10: P-82, 83, 85, 87, 95, 

    Due Wednesday: bring all the analyses for the elevator lab F vs. t data; Barrons Chapter 7 MX 1-5

    Due Thursday:  solve the toilet paper drop problem (one roll is freely dropped, one roll is unrolled during the drop; what ratio of heights will allow each roll to hit the ground at the same time?)

    Due Friday:presentations of elevator lab.  Follow the instructions, and note that we've reduced the time to 10min for presentation and 5 for questions for each group.

    Due next Monday: watch this video on frames of reference.....watch at 13 min to end to 25 min learn about Fictitious Forces and Noninertial Frames   http://archive.org/details/frames_of_reference

               Also due Monday: Barrons Chapter 7 MX 6-10

  • NOTE: I found two practice books that show all of the released AP FR and MX questions.  Look in FILES for these.

    Exam 2: Wednesday 2 Nov in class.; it will emphasize all material since exam 1, but is cumulative as well.

    Due Monday: 1. Do the famous "chain problem" for a frictionless chain of length L,mass M. Show that the velocity after it has  passed length x over the edge is v= x(g/L)1/2 and show that acceleration is a=(x/L)g (note, you don't need calculus for these).  Also find the time t necessary for the chain to leave the table top.  Also do AP 2009 M3. It's very similar.

    in class:  practice ap2011m1, ap1979m1; ap1980m2

    Due Tuesday:  Bring your questions and one good problem for exam prep.

    Due Wed: exam

    Thursday: have your elevator data and analysis ready and understood, we will discuss it.

    Due Friday: analyze this video on the corkscrew loop http://serc.carleton.edu/dmvideos/players/corkscrew_loop.html?hide_banner=true.  You don't need loggerpro.  Determine a) the net force on the passengers at the top of the loop, b) the net force on the at the bottom of the dip approaching the loop, c) the average drag on the car-train from beginning to end, and d) does the front car or the back car have a more thrilling ride?

    Due next Monday : introduce ping pong lab--how to take v data and get n;  10: P-45, 53, plus Barrons chpt 7: Free Response 1-4

    Due next Tuesday: 10: P-82, 83, 85, 87, 95

    Plans this week: review Giancoli chapter 8 classics: chapter 10 in text or chapter 7 in Barrons.

  • Due Monday: 2003 Mech 2 and 1999 mech 1; chpt 9: P-32, 51, 67, 75, 79, 113 (be prepared to present)

    Due Tuesday: show evidence that you have tested your elevator F vs t measurement and analysis.

    Due Wednesday: 9: P-53, 21, 13 AND 2 dot problem of your choice to present from chapter 9

    Due Thursday, 27 Oct:  group informal presentation on how data will be collected and analyzed for elevator lab.  Come prepared

       Thursday: demo ballistic pendulum and find vo

    Due Friday: 9: P-63, 71, 101, (31 optional).     and show the calculation for Vo from the ballistic pendulum 

    Due next Monday: 1. Do the famous "chain problem" for a frictionless chain of length L, mass M. Show that the velocity after it has  passed length x over the edge is v= x(g/L)1/2 and show that acceleration is a=(x/L)g (note, you don't need calculus for these).  Also find the time t necessary for the chain to leave the table top.  Also do AP 2009 M3. It's very similar.

    Exam 2: Wednesday 2 Nov; it will emphasize all material since exam 1, but is cummulative as well.

    look at 6.11 in Barrons, esp velocity part; look at Barrons 3 & 4 p 195.

  • Is AP Physics C the hardest AP exam?   look at "ap scores..." in files.

    Due Monday: (note I moved this from Friday) Lab report on projectile motion:  

    1. Also due with the report is a copy of the report guidelines found in Physics Tools.  I want you to circle every element of the guidelines that is included in your report.  Not all guidelines will be applicable, but most will.  Ask in class if there are questions.
    2. Look in "notes on lab reports" above because these aspects will be particularly important when grading
    3. As a reminder, this is added to the assignment
    • measure all possible inputs and outputs (R vo, etc)
    • confirm fit of projectile equations (given what  you measured, do the equations agree?)  specifically, quantify one variable/output against the equation  (this is another way to say what is above)
    • new to this lab, you are also to quantitate contributions to error.  be specific and be quantitative.  Include at least the error in setting the angle and the errors you find in the measured Range.
    • I've decided to require you to talk about and quantify drag for the ball.  Given that drag, what distance effect would you expect on R.  You have the tools to do this.  Use, for example, the vxo value and determine the drag force. 

     I will introduce elevator lab, Lab 5, due Nov 11. 

                **  If you want to regain points on your lab, come for a discussion with me on your graded lab and be prepared to talk about the improvements.  You can earn 1/2 the points back if you present good ideas.

    Due Tuesday: 8: P-35, 57, 65, 121; we'll practice 2001M1 & 2002M3 in class

    Due Wednesday: 9: P-5, 3, 9   Barrons Chpt 6    Practice exercises MX #5 and FR#4 (two masses and a spring)

    Due next Monday: 2003 Mech 2 and 1999 mech 1; chpt 9: P-32, 51, 67, 75, 79, 113 (be prepared to present)

    Due next Tuesday: show evidence that you have tested your elevator F vs t measurement and analysis.

    Due next Thursday, 27 Oct:  group informal presentation on how data will be collected and analyzed for elevator lab.  Come prepared.

    "There are two types of people in this world: those who can extrapolate from incomplete data."

  • Due Monday: Lab 4, projectile motion, data analysis due.  The video files are in FILES here, and you should confirm the launch velocity with the high speed video (420fps)  

    Due Tuesday: AP problem 2009 Mech 1; 7: P-45, 47

    Due Wednesday: 8: P-6, 23, 25, 27, 28; Choose one AP problem from the website that requires Energy for solving and be prepared to present to class

    Due Friday:  8: Q 6-9; P-34, 40, 84;    practice in class 2000 M2

    Due next Monday: (note I moved this from Friday) Lab report on projectile motion:  

    1. Also due with the report is a copy of the report guidelines found in Physics Tools.  I want you to circle every element of the guidelines that is included in your report.  Not all guidelines will be applicable, but most will.  Ask in class if there are questions.
    2. Look in "notes on lab reports" above because these aspects will be particularly important when grading
    3. As a reminder, this is added to the assignment.
      • measure all possible inputs and outputs (R vo, etc)
      • confirm fit of projectile equations give you the same R.  
      • you are also to quantitate propagation of error; be specific and be quantitative.  Include at least the error in setting the angle and the errors you observed in the measured Range.
      • I've decided to require you to talk about and quantify drag on the ball.  Given that drag, what distance effect would you expect on R.  You have already used the analytical tools to do this.  Use, for example, the vxo value and determine the drag force. 

    YOU MAY NOT KNOW THAT JC MAXWELL WAS ALSO A POET.  HERE IS AN ELECTRICAL LOVE POEM TO HIS FIANCEE, 1860.

  • Monday:    Exam 1 in class.

    Due  Tuesday:  A car driver going at some speed v suddenly finds a wide wall at a distance r in front of her. Should she apply brakes or turn the car in a circle of radius r to avoid hitting the wall?  You should assume there is friction with the ground (duh), and you have enough info and there is a definitive answer.  It should take about 3 lines of writing.   
    Also do AP 2000 Mech 3, and ignore the inertia of the pully (see files)

    Due Wednesday:  chapter 7: P-3, 5, 7, 9, 11

    Due Thursday;  Lab 4 Projectile motion in class, done as two groups.  Be prepared: study the projectile lab.  

    Due Friday: 7; P-19, 23, 27, 29, 35.

    Due next Monday: Lab 4, projectile motion, data analysis due.  The video files are in FILES here, and you should confirm the launch velocity with the high speed video (420fps)
    AP problem 2009 Mech 1; 7: P-45, 47

    • Last week was the birthday of rocket scientist Robert Goddard, born in Worcester, Massachusetts (1882). Goddard had been interested in outer space since he read H.G. Wells' The War of the Worlds when he was 16. He started thinking seriously about rockets the following year, in 1899.
    • He received a patent for his design for a liquid-fueled rocket in 1914, and another for one that ran on solid fuel.  He raised some money to do research and publish a paper on "A Method for Reaching Extreme Altitudes" in 1920. In the paper, he speculated that rockets could be used to reach the moon.
    • The New York Times heard about his paper, and published an editorial ridiculing him that a rocket couldn't work in a vacuum. He went from "nobody" to "national laughingstock" literally overnight, but he said, "Every vision is a joke until the first man accomplishes it; once realized, it becomes commonplace." He didn't give up, and on this date in 1926, he completed the first successful launch of his liquid-fueled rocket in Auburn, Massachusetts. The rocket reached a height of 41 feet and an average speed of 60 miles per hour.
    • Unfortunately, Goddard didn't live to see space flight become a reality; he died of cancer in 1945, and Sputnik was in 1958. In July 1969, the day after Apollo 11 departed for the Moon, The New York Times printed a correction to its scathing editorial of nearly 50 years before. The paper wrote, "It is now definitely established that a rocket can function in a vacuum as well as in an atmosphere. The Times regrets the error."
  • Due Monday:   lab report on filter and drag.  

    Due Tuesday: 6: P-60, 68, and a 3-dot problem of choice; Barrons chapter 4 MX 1-5.

    Optional challenge: find the function of the line defined by the outer envelope of motion of a given projectile cannon over all possible angles. look at this physlet and vary the angle from horizon to horizon to see the "envelope".    http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/projectile-motion

    due Wed: Barron's 4: mx 6-8, fr 2,3.  and for review: 1. What launch angle will give R = hmax in a projectile motion "on the level" cannon;  2. What car velocity will allow a banked turn of 90o for a given radius, m, and μ?  3. What turn bank angle is necessary for a frictionless track for given r, v, m of car? 

    due Thursday:6: Q1,3,5 P-19, 23, 59  

    due Friday:   none  I will hand out and we will discuss Lab on Projectile Motion, and review for the exam.

    Due next Monday:    Exam 1 in class.  it will cover through chapter 6

    Due next Tuesday:  A car driver going at some speed v suddenly finds a wide wall at a distance r in front of her. Should she apply brakes or turn the car in a circle of radius r to avoid hitting the wall?  You should assume there is a constant coefficient of friction with the ground.  Note: you have enough info and there is a definitive answer.  It should take about 3 lines of writing.

    Also do AP 2000 Mech 3, and ignore the inertia of the pully    1. What launch angle will give R = hmax in a projectile motion "on the level" cannon;  2. What car velocity will allow a banked turn of 90o for a given radius, m, and μ?  3. What turn bank angle is necessary for a frictionless track for given r, v, m of car?   

    Next wednesday:  chapter 7: P-3, 5, 7, 9, 11

    We'll look at the amazing Diavolo in class.

    activities: Quiz and practice 5:P-72 a,b and Problems 1,2 of Patel p39 (look under files)

    practice for the exam: 

    1. (10 points)   I drop a bowling ball of 5.4 kg from a tall cliff, and it reaches terminal velocity according to this equation for speed:
                          v = 850 (1-e-7.5t
      where t is time in seconds, and v is in m/s
      1. What is the terminal velocity?
      2. What is the distance travelled by the ball before it reaches terminal velocity?
      3. How much heat energy is dissipated by the ball before it reaches terminal velocity?
  • the answer key to odd problems is posted in FILES.

    Due Monday: 4: P39, 65, 63, 67, 107a, show the loggerpro analysis of all of your data in a table of terminal velocities (for the filters).  Turn it in (I'll give it back).

    Due Tuesday:. WE DAY, so some people gone.    Bring your terminal velocity data plotted in Excel to find n and k.

    Due Wed: 5: Q-2, 4, P-12, 53, 71  (always bring Barrons to class)

    Due Thurs: finish equipment inventory; turn in Barrons FRQ1 p 100.  Turn in rewrite on Galileo Lab.

    Due Friday: show completed graph of F vs vn; complete all parts of AP-C Mechanics FR1 found here: it's an interestig topic   http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap10_frq_physics_c_mech.pdf

    Due next Monday: lab report on filter and drag.  6: P-60, 68, and a 3-dot problem of choice; Barrons chapter 3 MX 1-5.

    Optional challenge: find the function of the line defined by the outer envelope of motion of a given projectile cannon over all possible angles. look at this physlet and vary the angle from horizon to horizon to see the "envelope".

    http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/projectile-motion

    exam 1: Oct 3; are you all here that day?

    A comment on report writing:

    • I'm raising the bar on your writing. We will do a bunch of reports of various types, and you will graduate from this class quite comfortable with writing good lab reports. That is my goal. So far I can see that reports and writing need some work, and I will hold the standard high.
    • Why?  Because convincing others that you know what you're talking about is of key importance. And most of your serious communication will be written.
    • A few common issues I see:
    • 0.  Narrative writing for reports means sentences and paragraphs.  It is telling a story with words.
    • 1. define any variable you introduce. e.g. Fg = the force of gravity on the puck; Θ is the angle between the table and the horizontal.
    • 2. any title for table or figure is a description of what is included. "Figure 1. Photo of sloping table with puck and detector in place"
    • 3. Learn how to make greek symbols and super and subscripts. It's not hard; don't use s^2 in place of s2
    • 4. Look for effects or results beyond those required. Show some curiosity. The world loves curious people.
    • 5. Always give a suggestion for improvement. You are being paid to think and make things better. Show that you have learned from your efforts.
    • 6. Take care when you write.   It requires 45 min for me to write a memo.  It probably will require you 2-3 times that long.  

  • Due Monday; be prepared to present, discuss, and improve the balloon calculation from Friday.  If you weren't ready on Friday,then you will be presenting first.

    we will learn about drag of the filter (powerpoint slides)
    We will also conduct the simple Galileo ramp as class and get some stopwatch data.

    Due Tuesday: Bring calculations for Galileo ramp part 2, with propagation of error for friction on the ramp.  
    Also do Barrons 2:MX 5,8 and FR 1,5

    Due Wed: Galileo lab report, full memo.  You have time for some prelim experiments for Lab 3 if you want.

    Thursday:  conduct Lab 3: freefall with Go Motion and Video analysis with coffee filter.   Refer to my discussion of drag and the physics of drag  

    Due Friday: 4 P-1,8, 9, 15, 17, 21, 23, 33, 43, 47, 53.  (do 6 of your choosing)       more Lab Equipment Tours 

    Due next Monday: 4: P39, 65, 63, 67, 107a, show the loggerpro analysis of all of your data in a table of terminal velocities (for the filters).  Turn it in (I'll give it back).

    Due next Tuesday.  bring your terminal velocity data plotted in Excel to find n and k.

     Points

    • Be able to solve problems in ijk vector notation
    •  Be able to identify parabolic relations and recognize parabolic motion
    • Be able to identify sin/cos relations and recognize circular motion
    • Be able to identify relative motion and solve in vectors

    galileo (Gal)

    the CGS unit of acceleration. One galileo is an acceleration of 1 centimeter per second per second (cm/s2). This unit is used by geologists, who make careful measurements of local variations in the acceleration of gravity in order to draw conclusions about the geologic structures underlying an area. These variations are typically measured in milligals (mGal). One Gal is approximately 0.001 019 7 g, where g is the acceleration of gravity, so a milligal is a very small acceleration, about 10-6 g. The name of the unit honors the Italian astronomer and natural philosopher Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), who proved that all objects at the Earth's surface experience the same gravitational acceleration. To avoid confusion with the symbol for the gallon, and to conform to the usual metric style, the symbol for this unit should be Gal rather than gal.

    Hey remember that cool cartoon on the Higgs?  Here's one on gravity waves, which were discovered last year.. http://www.phdcomics.com/tv/?v=4GbWfNHtHRg 

    And a reward for those who read all this entry: 

    www.youtube.com/embed/2rjbtsX7twc?list=UUTev4RNBiu6lqtx8z1e87fQ

  • I've posted a correct answer key to ODD problems in FILES; some of your books may be wrong.  Should I print a copy for you?

    F = G M1 M2/r        This is the equation for a model that describes the dollar volume of trade between two countries, F, as a product of a constant G, the M (size of economy) of each country) and the inverse of the distance, r, between the countries.    What do you suppose the name of this economic model is?

    OK, here's the AP physics theme song.  please learn and memorize.... 

    Due Tuesday: 2: P-53, 55, 63, 69, have latest Loggerpro available at home computer.  See tools for download.

    Tuesday: I'll give a quiz on chapter 2; know your kinematics.  GoMotion Kinematics challenge (/experiments/physics with Vernier/graph matching)

    Wednesday: Barrons chapter 2, MX exercises 3,4,6,7 and FR 2,3,4 (As I said, you need to purchase Barrons Study Guide 4th Ed.  Bring me $15 today and I will order one for you)
    Turn in, as a memo report, your analysis for Galileo Lab.  
    Be prepared for Galileo part 2

    Due Thursday: Q-7, 9; P-35, 44,  and 3 2-dot problems of your choice, and data analyzed from Lab3 for discussion  *Give 5 minute lab tour of your assigned equipment 

    Thursday: evaluate and test next steps in Galileo ramp lab.

    Due Friday: read http://what-if.xkcd.com/62, and then find by web research a relationship between sphere size/mass and terminal velocity in air.  Specifically, you should be able to show how big a spherical balloon must be to slow your terminal velocity to 10.m/s.  See figure below.  This problem is not for fun, there are good answers and you are expected to find one using accepted physics.  Why?  Because understanding drag through air is an important part of this year, and independent learning is a critical part of your life.

    Due next Wed; ch3: Lab 2 (galileo) Report due:full formal report, including photo, table of data (you must process and display data using Excel), sketch showing dimensions, propagation of error, comments on results, and suggestions to improve

    next week: we'll do lab on Go Motion and Video analysis with coffee filter

    * goals for this week:

    1. Detail how calculus adds to our def’n of velocity and acceleration
    2. Be able to determine v or x from an equation of a
    3. Interpret classic plots relating x, v, and a as fct of time
    4. Assess recall of motion graphs through review activity (5to5 p 80)

    figure 1.  Sketch of person mass m falling at terminal velocity vt using spherical balloon of negligible mass.

  • Due Monday : text problems chapter 1:9,19 (difficult), 25, 31, 43 and 1 other 2-dot problems.  

    in class: we will drop things and record their path with loggerpro.

    Due Wednesday: Hand in ramp analysis as assigned on Galileo Lab

    Due Thursday: Hand in short analysis of Monday and Tuesday Ball-drop demo as a HW problem; report the settings you used in Loggerpro, and carefully report the set up.  handwitten is fine.  Include a sketch of each set up.  The writing should be about a page long, and attach your loggerpro graphs that gave you acceleration.

    On Thursday: ARRIVE EARLY, 12:45 PM TO START LAB: bring prework assignment see attached lab "Find g as Galileo did"

    Due Friday: 2: p-3, 5, 15, 19, 27, 37, 41 

    Due next Tuesday: bring g data from lab.  2: P-53, 55, 63, 69, have latest Loggerpro available at home computer.  See tools for download instructions.

    Due next Thursday: give 5 minute lab tour of your assigned equipment. cz=mechanics vernier measurement; ty = mechanics mechanical measure; is=electricity statics equipment; zr&vl=electricity vernier measurement; el=mechanics equipment nonrotational; ed=mechanics equipment rotational

    Due  next Friday:  Lab 1 (galileo) Report due: 2 page memo, including photo, table of data (you must process and display data using Excel), sketch showing dimensions, propagation of error, comments on results, and suggestions to improve.

     Points:

    • Detail how calculus adds to our def’n of velocity and acceleration
    • Be able to determine v or x from an equation of a
    • Interpret classic plots relating x, v, and a as fct of time
    • Assess recall of motion graphs through review activity (5to5 p 80)
  • activity Monday:  find a value for g using available equipment
    HW due Tuesday: report a value for g from your experiment
    HW due Wednesday:  Bring solution to the problem assigned on Tuesday.   Read the entire Wikipedia entry for "physics" and be prepared to answer questions
    HW due next Monday: text problems chapter 1:9,19 (difficult), 22, 25, 53 and 1 other 2-dot problems.  
    HW due next Friday: give a 4 minute tour of your section of lab equipment
    Objectives for this week:
    • Understand the goals of this course
    • Explain how the pace and approach in the course will differ from last year
    • Apply your deep and long dormant knowledge of measurement and kinematics
    • show that you can be independent learners
  • This is our official class website. Please look at it weekly to see assignments, advice, reminders, clues, cartoons, and notices.
    You should always check here before you start your HW assignment, and you can subscribe so you'll get an email when I update it.
    As Seniors, I give you the responsibility to get the assignment sorted out if it's not clear to you.
    If I succeed, by the end of this year, you will pupate from a pupil to my peer.